State Projects Would Have To Use Pervious Concrete To Reduce Stormwater Runoff And Save Construction Costs Under New Law

The Assembly Environment and Solid Waste Committee held a hearing on legislation sponsored by Assembly Republican Whip Scott T. Rumana to require state agencies to use pervious concrete wherever possible to save construction costs and reduce stormwater runoff.

“Building walkways, access roads and parking lots with pervious concrete is among the best ways to recharge groundwater and manage stormwater runoff,” Rumana, R-Passaic, Bergen, Essex and Morris, said. “This innovative technology is smart environmental, fiscal and planning policy because it can reduce the need for stormwater management tools such as retention ponds.

“We can help the environment, make better use of our land and save taxpayers money by using porous concrete wherever it makes sense,” Rumana added.

The bill, A-1912, would require any state agency to use pervious concrete “wherever appropriate” including access roads, pathways, roadways and parking lots. The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection would be charged with adopting criteria for the use of pervious concrete on state projects.

“I thank my colleagues on the Environment committee for taking a serious look at this policy,” Rumana said. “Today’s hearing provided a good forum to showcase how this proposal would help our state’s environment and taxpayers. I look forward to advancing this measure as soon as possible with bipartisan support.”

The United States Department of Environmental Protection considers pervious concrete a best management practice for local and regional stormwater runoff. TLS.

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4 COMMENTS

  1. Pervious concrete probably should be called porous concrete. The idea is that the rain water would get absorbed directly into the concrete without causing flooding.

  2. The builder of the house I used to rent was a real visionary. He apparently built the house with a pervious roof so the rain safely drained into the house.

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